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January 18, 2016

Verifying Chinese Business License

Filed under: chinese economy — Tags: , — solaroutdoorlight @ 1:52 am

Most small businesses look to the “East” for suppliers and China is a highly sought after destination.

However, the key concern for these buyers is identifying reliable suppliers and safeguarding themselves from any potential risks. We will take a look at some simple ways to do this .

If you are a buyer looking for new suppliers in China, you might end up with a list of a couple of potential good ones. Of course you then want to find out whether these suppliers are indeed reliable and experienced, or whether it’s a scam, so make china company verification with a Factory Audit is very useful at this stage in.

When a factory audit is conducted by a third party quality control company, they always collect as much information as possible about the supplier of your choice. A large part of an audit consists of document collection. However, at the site it is not possible to verify these documents, especially business licenses, as they could be problematic. Chinese government authorities cannot legally protect your business if you are doing ‘business’ with illegal companies. However, there is only so much you can do to find out whether or not the license is legitimate.

First, what is a business license? Each legal company has to register itself with a local Chinese Bureau of Industry and Commerce or a similar government agency. Rural companies tend to register at a provincial level, but urban companies usually register at the city level. The company then gets a unique company number, which will be printed onto a nice document: the business license.

Then, how can we help you verify this unique company number and the business license? A QC company can check the business license itself for signs of forgery. There are several common ‘mistakes’ that we know how to find, such as false names or addresses, but this requires a close look and an experienced eye. At the factory, the auditor usually has to work his way through many documents, so he simply does not have the luxury to sit back with one document and take his time to inspect it. Therefore, this is much better done at the office. If any discrepancies are found in the document you can be certain the business license is a fake.

When there is no sign of forgery on the business license, it is not necessarily a legitimate document. The unique company number could still be false. Even though we possess the skills to find out the truth, an investigation might have inconclusive results. Sometimes it is sufficient to search for the supplier directly online through the website of the relevant Bureau of Industry & Commerce. However, note that all information from the Bureaus is in Chinese. At a provincial level in industrial provinces, like Guangdong province, information about business licenses is accessible online, but in less developed regions and on other governmental levels information is usually not readily available. In this case QC staff will contact the Bureau directly. It then depends on the Bureau how long it will take to get information and they will usually ask you to come by the Bureau in person an discuss the options.

As you can see, verifying a Chinese business license is a unique company registration number requires quite some effort, because there is not one database where all the numbers can be found. The registration system in China is very decentralized, which makes it hard to just go ahead and verify the business license by yourself. As a third party inspection company, AQF can definitely help out.

china company verification

china company verification

January 4, 2016

How about China’s economy tanks?

Filed under: chinese economy — Tags: , , — solaroutdoorlight @ 1:18 am

The Chinese housing bubble is at risk of bursting due to economic imbalances. If China’s housing bubble bursts, a shockwave will reverberate through its economy, causing a dramatic slowdown that will spread around the world. Utilizing a powerful new simulation tool, we forecast how a “hard landing” for China would impact the global economy.

China’s business climate is uncertain and growing more so by the day. Cheap china trade credit and a ballooning shadow banking sector in the past few years drove a massive increase in new lending, which fueled a red-hot real estate market and excess construction. As the economy cooled, the massive housing supply ramp-up resulted in high vacancy rates in some Chinese cities, which led to steep price discounts on new properties and rising default rates among smaller property developers.

Global corporations are watching China closely, wondering what will happen next. If the situation were to spiral out of control, they must be able to evaluate the impact on their business quickly and make appropriate course corrections. For instance, what does a hard landing in China mean for interest rates, trade, capital investment, commodity prices, and consumer demand, not only in China but in Europe, India, the US, and elsewhere? The more variables they can control to simulate possible scenarios, the better prepared they will be to respond to the one that actually unfolds.

Using a new econometric simulation tool called the Global Link Model, IHS is able to quantify the impact of economic shocks and regulatory changes to test a wide range of scenarios on the global economy. The model includes 68 countries and is linked to sector-specific econometric models, enabling users to see how changes in the macro-economy impact sectors and companies, as well as how changes at the micro level influence overall economic developments.

This article examines the consequences of just one scenario: a hard landing in China and the impact it would have on both the Chinese economy and the global economy. We define a hard landing as annual GDP growth for China of less than 5%. See the table at the end of this article that captures the impact on GDP growth for 15 of the largest economies in the world.

china trade credit

china trade credit

 

November 11, 2015

Company verification process in China

Filed under: chinese economy — Tags: , — solaroutdoorlight @ 1:00 am

For small business owners contacting with chinese corporator, making china company cerification is a first step that should be taken in order to protect their businesses from fraudulent activity and to make sure basic due diligence is done. This process is sometimes not simple in one’s own country, let alone in China, where newly arrived business owners might find it very difficult to navigate through the administrative maze, language barrier, and/or peculiarities of the host country’s procedures. In this post, we will explain how the company registration process works in China and will also go through the steps of checking a company’s registration information in the public government database.

What is the ‘gongshangju’?

The government organization responsible for overseeing and administering company registrations is the Administration of Industry and Commerce or ‘gongshangju’ in Pinyin. You can either go to one of their offices  and request the information needed in person or you can go to their website and find a company by their registration number or company name. Different provinces have different online directories (some more consistent than others), but provinces with industrial hubs usually have a very reliable system.

How to check a company’s registration report?

1. First, you should know where the company is registered and select the regional database on the main AIC website you want to access. (Usually, this is in the company’s address. For a list of Chinese provinces, click here.) In this post, we are focusing on how the Shanghai AIC website works; however, these steps might be slightly different depending on which database you are trying to use.

2. Enter the full company name in Chinese (or registration number), and if you find the company you are looking for on the results page, select ‘more info’.

October 26, 2015

Easier to Make Chinese Company Check

Filed under: chinese economy — Tags: , — solaroutdoorlight @ 8:20 am

Credit checks of Chinese companies have been made significantly easier with an online National Chinese Company Credit Information database providing free information about Chinese domestic companies to the public.

China’s State Administration of Industry and Commerce has launched the National Company Credit Information System which is an online resource that provides free information about companies to the public. This followed the Provisional Rules on Enterprise Information Disclosure act which took effect on October 1 last year. The new disclosure act require all companies, foreign and domestic in the PRC to submit annual credit reports for public disclosure via the publicly available Enterprise Credit and Information Disclosure System which can be accessed online on a real-time basis. With the new online database, anyone can simply log in and access relevant financial, asset and legal liabilities information – greatly improving financial transparency among businesses in China.

– This is good news for anyone evaluating suppliers and potential business partners in China, says Per Linden, CEO of the consulting firm Scandic Sourcing. One year ago, credit disclosure companies stopped getting access to tax reports, which made it difficult to make credit checks of Chinese companies. To get accurate info, we had to ask the companies themselves to disclose their annual audit reports, which they may or may not do. Now, the publicly available Credit and Information Disclosure System circumvents all that, and I think this is a big step towards simplifying credit checks in China.

Screenshots from the search function of the new online resource for credit disclosure which Chinese companies (and any other company operating in China) are expected to submit their financial information to.

The information companies are required to provide includes corporate registration data, record filing, chattel equity pledge registration, mortgage registration, and notably administrative penalties levied by the Chinese Administration of Industry and Commerce. Look for the latter when evaluating a potential partner or supplier; it’s an important indicator of a company’s creditworthiness and integrity that used to be confidential. The companies themselves are responsible for the authenticity and legality of the information they disclose and spot checks on the disclosed information will be conducted; third parties may report any information they suspect is false.

Companies that fail to submit their reports in time will be recorded in the directory of companies with abnormal business operations and if the company fail to fulfill their disclosure obligations within three years, they will be recorded in the directory of companies with serious illegal conduct, and their legal representative or person-in-charge will be prohibited from becoming a legal representative or person-in-charge of any other company for three years.

More imformation about chinese company, pls visit Cnbizsearch: http://www.cnbizsearch.com/

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